Material Alterations to lobby

Material Alterations

We receive numerous questions from our condominium association clients regarding proposed “material alterations” to the common elements. In general, the board is empowered with authority to maintain the common elements. However, certain changes to the common elements may be considered a “material alteration” which may require unit owner approval. Florida courts have held that a material alteration is one which “palpably or perceptively varies or changes the form, shape, elements or specifications” of the common elements “in such a manner as to appreciably effect or influence its function, use or appearance.” Sterling Village Condominium, Inc. v. Breitenbach, 251 So.2d 685 (Fla. 4th DCA 1971). In many instances the material alteration questions we receive pertain to redecorating common elements, such as a lobby area. If the change in the new décor theme of the lobby is considered a material alteration (as opposed to routine maintenance/replacement), approval of the unit owners may be required. Section 718.113(2)(a), Florida Statutes, requires 75% of the total voting interests to approve a material alteration unless the declaration provides for an alternative approval method/standard. Many condominium association declarations contain a provision which specifically establishes a unit owner approval standard for material alterations to the common elements. Other governing documents specifically carve out exceptions whereby the board of directors alone can approve certain material alterations without the need to obtain unit owner approval. For example, many governing documents will grant the board discretion to approve a material alteration if the cost of said alteration is below a specific dollar amount. This area of condominium law is complex and there are additional considerations which may impact the ultimate analysis (e.g. what if the alteration is required to comply with code, etc.), which are beyond the scope of this article.

 

David G. Muller

David G. Muller

Board Certified Condominium and Planned Development Law Attorney, Becker
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